Saturday, June 22, 2013

Who painted this? #32?

Given I've been preoccupied by portraits all week, I thought that a suitable painting for "Who painted this?" would be - a portrait.

Who painted this? #32
So here we have a lady of indeterminate age and provenance playing a stringed instrument.

All you have to do is work out what that instrument is and then you should get the painting and the painter and the rest of the details that I ask for.  Don't forget to right click the pic to see a larger version.

How to participate in "Who painted this? #32"


PLEASE make sure you read the rules before posting a comment - and ONLY POST ON THIS BLOG what you think is the answer.
Click this link to read THE RULES for participating in this challenge (this saves having to copy them out for each post!).

In short:
  • use your brains not software to find the answer
  • search using words only on a database of images
  • leave your answer as a comment on this blog
  • if correct it will not be published until the next post - which provides the answer
  • if wrong it will be published
  • do not leave the answer on Facebook!
  • the winner - who gets a mention and a link on/from this blog - is the first person to give me a completely correct answer for ALL the things I want to know

Who Painted This #31 - The Answer

Ramsgate Sands (Life at the seaside)
Royal Collection
[right CLICK and open in a new tab to see a larger image]
Frith has been described as the "greatest British painter of the social scene since Hogarth".

This is one of Frith's pencil sketches for this painting

His personal life and marital affairs make for interesting reading!

Who guessed correct?


Alyson Champ (The Chronicle of Wasted Timegot the correct answer first.  I loved this contribution she found en route to locating this painting
Interesting to note that this panoramic seaside painting took 3 years to complete and contains over 100 figures (yikes!). Queen Victoria fell in love with it and bought it from Frith for a thousand pounds. A princely sum for the time!
Others who guessed correctly (or very nearly so) were:
If you'd like to study how people get the correct answer try studying past challenges which are listed in the Page Who painted this? - at the the top of the Page.  Since of the requirements is to say how you found it, you can see the various ways people get to the answer.





15 comments:

  1. Title.....Self Portrait as Lute Player
    Artist......Artemesia Gentileschi
    Date....1615-1617
    Medium......Oil
    Where it is......Curtis Galleries, Minneapolis
    How I found it....I knew the instrument was a lute ,so Googled Lady playing lute and the image came up
    Bernadette Madden

    ReplyDelete
  2. Katherine, in reply to Who painting this #32:
    Title of the painting:
    Self portrait (c.1615-1617)
    Artist: Artemisia Gentileschi
    Where it's kept:Curtis Galleries, Minneapolis
    medium: oil on canvas,
    dimensions: 30.5" x 28.25"
    77.5 x 71.8 cm
    I searched for the name of the instrument: mandoline with bent neck and found that it's a lute. then I found the painting in google images.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Katherine, in reply to Who painting this #32:
    Title of the painting:
    Self portrait (c.1615-1617)
    Artist: Artemisia Gentileschi
    Where it's kept:Curtis Galleries, Minneapolis
    medium: oil on canvas,
    dimensions: 30.5" x 28.25"
    77.5 x 71.8 cm
    I searched for the name of the instrument: mandoline with bent neck and found that it's a lute. then I found the painting in google images.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Artemisia Gentileschi
    Self Portrait Playing the Lute, 1615 - 1617
    Artist -Artemisia Gentileschi (1593–1653)
    Title - Self-portrait
    Date - 1615-1617
    Medium oil on canvas
    Dimensions 30 × 28 cm (11.8 × 11 in)
    Current location -Curtis Galleries, Minneapolis
    Used Google/Bing to word search using portrait of a mandolin player and found an image which gave me the correct instrument name as lute - link from there to various sites which had various titles for the painting. Used the wikimedia commons site for information.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Artist
    Artemisia Gentileschi (1593–1653) Link back to Creator infobox template wikidata:Q212657
    Title Self-portrait
    Date 1615-1617
    Medium oil
    Dimensions 30 × 28 cm (11.8 × 11 in)
    Current location Curtis Galleries, Minneapolis

    I used Bing/Google to search for portrait of a mandolin player - many links found with various names. I used wikimedia commons for the information.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Artemisia Gentileschi
    Self-Portrait as a Lute Player
    1615-1617
    Curtis Galleries Minneapolis USA
    I knew the instrument was a lute....thought Peter Paul Rubens was a possibility. Thus, the answer just a small step away.

    Thank you so interesting. I was amazed to find it was a woman who was trained by her father. Unheard of at the time!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  7. Self Portrait
    Artemisia Gentileschi
    1615-1617
    Oil Painting
    Curtis Galleries Minneapolis.

    I searched for lady in a blue dress playing a lute.

    ReplyDelete
  8. It took some searching of 1800 century stringed instruments before I found out that it was a lute that she was playing and not a guitar, after that it was petty easy to find.

    Artist Artemisia Gentileschi
    Title Self-portrait
    Date 1615-1617
    Medium oil
    Dimensions 30 × 28 cm (11.8 × 11 in)
    Current location Curtis Galleries,Minneapolis

    ReplyDelete
  9. Easy one thanks to the lute! Found on Wiki.

    Self Portrait with Lute

    Artemisia Gentileschi

    c. 1615-1617
    oil

    11.8 x 11"

    Hangs in the Curtis Galleries, Minneapolis, MN, USA

    ReplyDelete
  10. Title:"Self Portrait as a Lute Player:
    Artemesia Gentileschi
    1615-1617
    Size: 30 x 28cm
    Currently in Curtis Galleries, Minneapolis

    I searched for "Stringed Instruments first (Thanks for the clue) then "Portrait with Lute" and the photo of the painting was at the top of the search list!
    Then to Wikipedia for the details.

    ReplyDelete
  11. It's a lute. That bent back neck gives it away. I play classical guitar and am a medieval recreationist. Wasn't hard to find as an image especially when it's one of my favourite female artists of the time. "Self Portrait as a Lute Player" by Artemisia Gentileschi

    ReplyDelete
  12. "Self Portrait as a Lute Player" by Artemisia Gentileschi. I play classical guitar and am a medieval recreator, that is I play music at modern day medieval feasts and know what a lute looks like :) That bent neck gave it away. I also adore Artemisia Gentileschi as one of the great female artists of her time.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Mr C identified this as a lute and the rest was plain sailing.
    Googled painting lute woman
    I found the first reference on the Durand gallery website and from there to a website dedicated to her life and work.

    Self portrait with lute (c.1615-1617)
    Artemisia Gentileschi

    Curtis Galleries, Minneapolis
    oil on canvas

    She was one of the first female artists to paint historical and religious paintings, at a time when such heroic themes were considered beyond a woman’s reach.

    ReplyDelete

  14. Title of artwork: "Self-portrait (as a lute player)"

    Name of Artist: Artemisia Gentileschi

    Date : 1615-1617

    Medium: Oil

    Where it lives now: Curtis Galleries, Minneapolis, USA

    How I got this answer: I searched for a list of guitar like instruments. In that list I found mandolin closest in appearance. When I searched for "girl with mandolin" etc. I did not get any similar images. So I tried "girl with guitar" and found the image. But the discription was in Spanish. I got it translated with google translator and got the title "Self Portrait ( as a lute player)". I got the rest of the details from wikimedia commons.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Hi Katherine
    I hope I'm posting to the right place for "Who painted this #32".
    Title of the artwork: Self-portrait as a lute player.
    Artist: Artemisia Gentileschi
    Date created: 1615-1617
    Media: Oil on canvas
    Where it lives now: Curtis Galleries, Minneapolis
    My search: In Google Images, the three centres of interest in the painting: "lute, turban, bosom". As it turned out, only the first two would have sufficed! Ninth in the list was this painting on a page from the dubiously-named WTF Art History. A light-hearted site I've not seen before.
    Checking elsewhere, Artemisia was clearly proud of her embonpoint, judging from "Self-portrait as the Allegory of Painting" in the UK Royal Collection. That translation, repeated in other sites and for further self-portraits, is why I prefer the title as above, from Wikimedia Commons, rather than WTF's "Self-portrait with lute". I can't find the Italian original.
    The Curtis Galleries are elusive online. One source says "Private collection"; another says they are part of the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, but the painting is not in that online catalogue.

    ReplyDelete

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