Tuesday, November 10, 2009

The garden behind the paintings - Giverny

I've written about Monet and his gardens before - at some length - but this is the first time I've been able to show readers what Monet's garden at Giverny actually looks like.

Below you can find two videos. You can imagine you're Monet is you like (if you ignore the noise from cars and other visitors!) and take
These are links to the photos I took which are on Flickr
Below you can also see a drawing I'm still working on of the water garden at Giverny - based on a sketch of the same scene.

(Work in Progress) The Water Garden at Giverny
9" x 12", coloured pencils on Arches HP
copyright Katherine Tyrrell
You can also read about my visit to Giverny on 1st October this year over on Travels with a Sketchbook - in The Water Garden at Giverny

For people who have not read about Monet and his gardens before, here's a note of my previous posts on this blog about Monet and gardens:

Giverny

Other gardens painted by Monet
Note - Of course if you were really Monet you'd have both sets of big green doors wide open and you'd walk back across the road rather than using the tunnel under the road which is now a lot busier than it was when he lived there!

5 comments:

Joan said...

I really enjoyed seeing your video and photos taken at Monet's Gardens. I took a ton of photos, but didn't think of doing a video. Thanks for sharing all your information and your memories of your trip.

Margaret Ryall said...

Monet's Garden is quite beautiful and almost too inspiring. I was lucky enough to visit it in 2001 and came away with many photographs and several journal entries. The flowers have show up in many of my works since then but never labelled with their home.

EH said...

Thanks for your views and documentations on Giverny on this blog and on Squidoo. It "relaxes" the sometimes almost overloaded aura of that place. For same reason I appreciate your great pencil painting as it is much different in many aspects from the standard views that have been re-produced over and over.

Natalie Ford said...

Is it the Close Normande or the Clos Normande?

Katherine Tyrrell said...

"Clos" - it means "Closed"

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