Saturday, October 06, 2012

Reverse Glass Painting

Following on from yesterday's post, Verre Églomisé - an introduction - I've learned a lot about reverse glass painting - including that:
  • it is also known as Hinterglas painting if the heritage which informs it is Middle European and Germanic
  • it's a form of painting used in both China and India
  • a tradition also developed within North America as immigrants brought their folk art with them
I've also been very impressed by some of the artwork I've seen - although there's also a fair amount of 'folk art' which is rather less sophisticated.  As always, the impact of this technique very much depends on the skill of the artist

See, for example, this painting by Jan van der Heyden which is in the Rijksmuseum Collection

View in the woods by Jan van der Heyden [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
Date between 1660 and 1690
Medium Verre églomisé, Dimensions 34 × 42.5 cm (13.4 × 16.7 in)
For those who would also like to learn more about this art, I've rounded up all the authoritative links to online information about this approach to making art which I could find on the Internet and created a new website.  

See Verre Églomisé - Reverse Glass Painting for links to more information about:
  • the history of reverse glass painting
  • techniques for producing reverse glass paintings
  • artists who produce reverse glass paintings
Obviously it's still at an early stage of development and I'd love to hear about any more useful links which are not yet included and/or any artists who specialise in this field.

1 comment:

Michelle Basic Hendry said...

You need to see the work of Bonnie Bews. She was trained in Hinterglas in Germany and currently lives in Canada. Her work is stunning.

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